UNEP

Wild For Life

The Wild for Life Campaign aims to motivate citizens worldwide to support an end to the illegal wildlife trade. Leveraging BeSci principles such as social proof, normative feedback and precommitment, the campaign seeks to encourage individual pledges to advocate against the illegal wildlife trade and to make consumption choices that do not threaten species (e.g. not buying products made from protected wildlife, supporting companies that demonstrate sustainable supply chains). The campaign is supported by an influencer-driven, social-first strategy, seeking to leverage UNEP’s online strengths and network of celebrity champions, who have helped Wild for Life reach over a billion people and engage at least ten million as measured through likes, shares and follows.

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February 17, 2022

Bike Ambulances to improve Emergency Obstetric Care in Rural Areas

Maternal mortality and morbidity rates remain high in Cote d’Ivoire. It is estimated that more than six women out of a thousand are dying while delivering birth, while 0.7% of the women of childbearing age have fistula in the country (MICS, 2016). While the strengthening of the health system is taking place, women in the country, especially in the rural area, stay vulnerable to the high risk of maternal death and morbidity. From behavioral perspectives, the barriers that leads to the three delays–(1) deciding to seek care; (2) identifying and reaching a medical facility; (3) receiving adequate and appropriate treatment may include the following (Cichowitz et al., 2018): Factors related to the first delay: social norms (community prefers to deliver at home), limited transportation and health care services at night, and negative experience in hospitals in the past (lack of trust). Factors related to the second delay of reaching a medical facility: a lack of available transportation, long travel times, and perception of high medical costs (walking 36.5%, car 34.6%, bus 13.5%, and motorcycle 13.5% in case of a study in Tanzania). In this context, this rapid prototyping initiative seeks to develop a new low-cost, safe transportation for women to prevent maternal mortality and morbidity in rural areas, by tackling the barriers that often lead to delay of emergency obstetric care (EmOC). It also aims to collect and utilize the GPS data/information of the bike ambulances to enable regional hospitals and the government to make better decisions in providing care, utilize hospital ambulances efficiently, and enhance communication between the care-seeker and care-provider.
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